Jubilant – Blog Carnival

Welcome to the One Word At A Time Blog Carnival – this week’s word is: Jubilant.

Below this, you’ll find a little widget called Simply Linked. All the participants in the carnival add their links to the widget and that way we can all find and read everyone’s entries. You’re welcome to join us, the carnival is open to anyone.

To see all of the upcoming words and their dates, visit http://peterpollock.com/category/faith/carnival/

 

 

Why Only Jubilant When The Going Is Good?

Should we only celebrate when we FEEL like it, or is celebration not dependent on emotion?

There is a constant battle which seems to go on in the hearts and minds of Christians and that is one of how to ‘praise Him in the storm’.

How often do we read, or are we told that we should praise God even in the hardest of times? …. and how many times do we actually do it?

There are definitely times when we feel a sense of jubilation and we want to jump up and down and praise God for whatever it is we’re feeling right at that moment. Then, though, there are those other moments when we’re feeling the weight of the world on our shoulders and even though we know there is plenty to praise God for, we find it impossible because we don’t FEEL jubilant.

The events of recent weeks have brought home to me the fact that we are really just making excuses for ourselves and, in reality, we all find it all too easy to celebrate even in spite of the circumstances.

Most of you will know that recently the Queen of England celebrated the 60th anniversary of her ascension to the throne.

All of the UK celebrated with her and there were street parties and events up and down the country – and, in fact, all over the world.

So I’m wondering… did the Queen somehow fly over the country with a magic wand and instantly alleviate all the pain and hardship of the people?

Or did we celebrate DESPITE our problems?

Seriously, sixty years ago some woman was crowned queen and so we managed to find it in ourselves to jubilantly celebrate the fact that she has spent sixty years being waited on hand-and-foot and bowed and scraped to by the best of them?

The reasons why we celebrate such an event are many and varied and I don’t have the space or desire to go into them here but the point is this:

We found a reason to celebrate and so, despite the economy, despite our sicknesses and disease, despite our family problems and failing relationships, despite everything that is happening in our lives, we could look up and celebrate together something that was somehow greater than all of our troubles.

So if we could do it for the queen, why do we find it so hard to do for the King of Kings and Lord of Lords, our creator and savior and redeemer?

I wonder.

I really wonder…..

About PeterP

I am a blogger, author, stay at home dad, speaker, web hosting trainer and geek (I was so excited to get an iPad that I actually made up a song and dance about it). I am English by birth, but currently live in California with my wife and our three children. I ran a web hosting business for nine years and found that many, if not most of my clients had never learned how to use any of the functions associated with hosting so I wrote a book to try and teach just those skills. I must admit to having fallen in love with WordPress (possibly a little TOO much) and I honestly find it hard to understand why anyone would use anything different to build a site! WordPress is wonderful! My passion is to help others achieve their goals with their websites/blogs. I believe that, with a little help, anyone can have an awesome site.

12 thoughts on “Jubilant – Blog Carnival”

  1. Peter, you made a great point with the comparison to the Queen’s anniversary celebration. You’re right, sometimes we do find a reason to celebrate in spite of our personal circumstances, so why not do it for our Lord? Wow, that one hit home for me…

  2. Carol says:

    Your word for this week gave me pause. When am I jubilant? You offer the best reason for celebration. Thank-you

  3. Father Stephen says:

    I once heard a story, whether it’s true I cannot say but its meaning is clear even if it’s fiction. The story is that in the early 1930’s two young sisters were on holiday in Scotland with their parents. In those days there was much less fear than today, so young children could happily go for walks and play in the countryside without their parents being the least concerned. These two girls however came from a rather rich family so their father had told them that they must never tell anyone who they were. One day during that holiday they walked for a long way across the Scottish moors and became quite thirsty. They knocked on the door of an isolated farmhouse and asked for a drink of water. While they were drinking the lady looked quizzically at them and asked “who are you, you’re not from around these parts but I’m sure I know you?” Margaret, the younger sister, looked at her big sister Elizabeth wondering how to answer without telling a lie. Elizabeth hesitated a little and then said ‘who we are doesn’t matter, but our father is the King’.

    What we now celebrate, after the passing of 60 years since that same girl became Queen Elizabeth II, is not that she has had such good food and medical care that she is still going strong, but that we, as a people, are united under her reign. For a moment we can forget our troubles and rejoice that we belong to something that is bigger and more durable than ourselves.

    In the same way I can say that who I am (complete with all my troubles and inadequacies) is not important but my Father is The King. I am part of something bigger than my own private world. I am united with an immense family throughout the earth which is nomore than durable; it is a kingdom that shall never end. It is good, as often as possible to join with the local members of that family and be glad that we are part of that kingdom. Even when I am alone there is no diffence. My brothers are still my brothers, my sisters do not cease to be my sisters, and our Father is still their King and mine, I am still, and always will be, a citizen of heaven. Therefore I rejoice.

    1. Father Stephen says:

      Correction : in the last paragraph it should say ‘which is more than durable’ not ‘nomore’

  4. Hazel Moon says:

    Praise Him when the sun shines, and know that we can also praise Him because He is with us in the Storm!

  5. Hazel Moon says:

    Thank you Peter for hosting the One Word Carnival. I am late this week, but I will return.

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